12 Dec 2017| Fashion News

One of the most significant personalities of British Fashion, the designer Zandra Rhodes, collaborates with Christopher Guy.

One of the most significant personalities of British Fashion, the designer Zandra Rhodes, collaborates with Christopher Guy.

She has dressed, among others, Princess Diana, Freddie Mercury and Lauren Bacall. Some of her pieces are in the collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Arts Costume Institute and the F.I.T. library. Her glossy, one of a kind aesthetics have been presented many times in Vogue. This “crazy” British woman with the deep red hair, the theatrical makeup and the extravagant layers of jewelry, who is considered one of the best textile designers, is the person who brings some creative fresh air in the high gloss furniture house Christopher Guy this season!

More precisely, Zandra Rhodes borrows her unconventional way to the British house C.G and her emblematic prints turn to spectacular paintings for our house. Rhodes considers herself “an artist working in the field of textiles and fashion,” which is why the transition from designing clothes to creating pieces that hang on the wall felt so natural she says. Her creative process always starts with a drawing, and then she tests how the drawing falls on the body.

Each piece of the collection was accented with the types of thoughtful details that one rarely sees outside of couture: small pearls placed evenly around a collar, raw edges that expose the construction of the fabric, patterns that complement the drape of a skirt. “I think that to do textiles, it takes as much effort as doing a painting, therefore I think it qualifies just as much to be a work of art,” Rhodes said.

It is certain that collaborations like that always give an interesting, fresh result, that worth it to be placed in our house and to be considered like a piece of art. Besides, the art, the fashion, the decoration, are fields with many similarities… Like Zandra said, while staring at one of her paintings for C.G. hanging at the wall: “As an artist, you always hope that people want your work. You always hope that people can look at it and go. I want that memory on my wall. Because if they don’t, what pretenses are you under?”

 

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